Faculty: Biography

Michael Doyle, Ph.D.
Regents Professor and Director
Center for Food Safety
Address: 1109 Experiment Street
University of Georgia
Griffin, GA 30223-1797
Office:
Phone: (770) 228-7284
Email: mdoyle@uga.edu
Biosketch
B.S. BacteriologyUniversity of WisconsinMadison, WI1973
M.S. Food MicrobiologyUniversity of WisconsinMadison, WI1975
Ph.D. Food MicrobiologyUniversity of WisconsinMadison, WI1977
Post-doctoral Experience
Honors and Awards
The Pound Research Award, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1985

Samuel Cate Prescott Award for Research, Institute of Food Technologists, 1987

American Agricultural Economics Association Award for Professional Excellence, 1992

Norbert F. Sherman Award for Article Excellence, International Association of Milk, Food and Environmental Sanitarians, 1993

James H. Nakano Citation, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1994

P. R. Edwards Award, Southeastern Branch of the American Society for Microbiology, 1994

Nicholas Appert Award, Institute of Food Technologists (for outstanding contributions to the field of Food Science), 1996

Silver Plow Honor Award for Exceptional Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, 1998

Food Safety Award, National Food Processors Association AND International Association for Food Protection, 1999

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Partners in Public Health Honor Award, 2001

Director's Award, Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, IFT Threat Assessment Group, 2003

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee Service Award, Science Board, Office of FDA Commissioner, 2003

American Meat Institute Foundation's Scientific Achievement Award, 2004

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissionerís Special Citation, 2006

Ohio State University Harris Award for Excellence in Food Science and Technology, 2009

Inventor of the Year Award, University of Georgia, 2010 (co-inventor with Tong Zhao)
Research Interests
Research and development of food safety interventions to mitigate contamination or growth of foodborne bacterial pathogens along the entire food continuum, from the farm to the fork. Bacteria of principal interest include Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli, and Campylobacter. Interventions include: (1) probiotic bacteria to reduce intestinal carriage of foodborne bacterial pathogens by cattle and poultry, and to reduce contamination of Listeria monocytogenes in food processing facilities, (2) antimicrobial wash treatments such as levulinic acid plus sodium lauryl sulfate that are bactericidal to pathogens but do not adversely affect the quality characteristics of foods, and (3) antimicrobial food preservatives such as novel organic acids in combination with antimicrobial synergists to suppress survival and growth of harmful bacteria in both raw and processed foods.
Representative Publications
Taxue, R.V., M.P. Doyle, T. Kuchenmiiller, J. Schlundt, and C.E. Stein. 2010. Evolving public health approaches to the global challenge of foodborne infections. Int. J. Food Microbiol. Supplement 1, 139:S16-S28.

Mead, G., Lammerding, A.M., Nelson, C., Doyle, M.P., Humbert, F., Klikovskiy, A., Panin, A., do Nascimento, V.P., Wierup, M., and the Salmonella on Raw Poultry Committee, (May) 2010. Scientific and technical factors affecting the setting of Salmonella criteria for raw poultry: A global perspective. J. Food Protect. 73:1566-1590.

Critzer, F. J., and M. P. Doyle. 2010. Microbial Ecology of Foodborne Pathogens Associated with Produce. Current Opinion in Biotechnol. 21:125-130.

Heringa, S.D., J-K. Kim, X. Jiang, M. P. Doyle, and M. C. Erickson. 2010. Use of a Mixture of Bacteriophages for Biological Control of Salmonella enterica Strains in Compost. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76:5327-5332.

Erickson, M. C., C. C. Webb, J. C. Diaz-Perez, S. C. Phatak, J. J. Silvoy, L. Davey, A. S. Payton, J. Liao, and M. P. Doyle. 2010. Infrequent internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into field-grown leafy greens. J. Food Protect. 73:500-506.
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